Install QGIS on a Mac in 8-Steps

**UPDATED FOR QGIS 2.16 – 07 Oct 2016**

QGIS is an impressively powerful open source geographic information system (GIS). In 2010, I reviewed QGIS when it had an “All-In-One” installation bundle for the Mac. That one-step installation has gone by the wayside, and while QGIS is an excellent GIS solution for Mac users, installation is much more of a chore. As a software developer myself, I can only imagine the installation process discourages use by the average consumer (and by average, I mean moderately sophisticated GIS users).

If you’re in that camp, this guide is for you… it provides (without warranty) a step-by-step guide to successfully install the supporting frameworks and the QGIS software. These instructions are for QGIS 2.16 built for Mac OS X Mountain Lion, Mavericks, Yosemite, El Capitan, and (hopefully) MacOS Sierra.

Installing QGIS on a Mac

Step One: Honesty

Installing most software on a Mac is easy, but installing QGIS on a Mac is a pain (though it is getting easier with each release!)¹. I’ve stumbled through it a couple of times now.

There are supporting frameworks that must be installed first, and in a particular order, before the QGIS installation can begin. If you try installing QGIS before installing the supporting frameworks, you’ll likely see an error message like this:

qGIS installation error

Also, always read the ReadMe files included with your downloads before installing. For example, this important ReadMe message is included with the QGIS Installer:

 If you have an old QGIS.app in your Applications folder, trash it before installing QGIS 2.16.
 Old files may not be deleted by the installer, which may cause problems for QGIS2.16

In summary, the following download is required:

  1. Download QGIS for Mac Installer. There is no need to download and install these frameworks individually if this package is installed. All required items are included on the disk image, which includes:
    • GDAL Complete.pkg (installs framework package)
    • NumPy.pkg (installs python module)
    • Matplotlib.pkg (instalsl python module)
    • Install QGIS.pkg (installs the app!)
The Real 10 8 Steps

STEP 1. To allow installation of non-Apple developer recognized software, first change your Mac Security Preferences to ‘Allow apps downloaded from: Anywhere’

STEP 2. Download the ‘QGIS for Mac’ installer

Download QGIS for Mac Installer. Double-click the ‘QGIS-2.6.1.dmg’ to view its contents:

qgis-2-16-installer

STEP 3. install GDAL Complete —  double-click the ‘GDAL Complete.pkg’ and step through its installation.

STEP 4. Install NumPy — double-click the ’NumPy.pkg’ and step through its installation.

 

STEP 5. Install Matplotlib —  double-click the ‘matplotlib.pkg’ and step through its installation.

 

STEP 6. Install QGIS —  double-click the ‘Install QGIS.pkg’ and step through its installation.

STEP 7. Proceed to your Applications folder and find the QGIS app. Double-click to launch.

Be patient, it took a little less than a minute on first launch for my copy of QGIS to fully open. Also, even if you are familiar with GIS software, don’t expect QGIS to be completely intuitive. Like any new app, you need to take the time to learn its features and user interface. Fortunately, there are some terrific learning resources available, like the QGIS Tutorials and Tips by Ujaval Gandhi and the QGIS User Guide.

You now have a sophisticated GIS software to learn and enjoy. Depending on your needs, you might even want to add some of the QGIS Plugins.

STEP 8. Your almost done! To finish things off you should do the following:

a. Change your Mac Security Preferences back to ‘Allow apps downloaded from: Mac App Store and Identified Developers’ (or Mac App Store only).
b. Save the QGIS.dmg files, since they each contain uninstall instructions should you ever need them.

 

¹ Software isn’t always easy. I really appreciate the great work of good folks who support this open source (and free) software. The main release packages for QGIS for Mac are maintained by Kyngchaos, aka William Kyngsburye. (thank you!)

Written History Needs Maps

Guest post by Pieter S. Burggraaf, 2015

Put it before them briefly so they will read it, clearly so they will appreciate it, picturesquely so they will remember it, and, above all, accurately so they will be guided by its light.

– From the pen of Joseph Pulitzer (1847-1911)

The telling of history needs illustrative maps. In a rather simple view, history is the movement of people across geography in the past. Henry Walker and Don Bufkin captured this idea in their wonderful reference book Historical Atlas of Arizona. According to these authors, “History is the story of man—his actions, his comings and goings, and his settlements. As most of mankind’s actions and travels and the places” where men and women settled are “controlled by natural settings—terrain, climate, geography, and even geology—an understanding of the land is essential to an understanding of history.”(1)

Unfortunately, in so many books today about historic events, and even many of the classic books of yesterday, the text usually screams for a map to illustrate where events happened and what the people of the times thought they knew about the lay of the land. In many written histories, the maps used seem to have been an afterthought with authors or publishers plugging-in whatever they could find. Many times, the maps used do not provide the details that are necessary to support the text where the maps are called out. Often the maps used are disconnected from the period of history being discussed. Or, large maps are crammed into a small book format rendering them illegible.

When I began writing The Walker Party, The Revised Story my goal was to put equal effort into the many maps that I felt the work needed. It took some time for me to get map-making right—almost six months—but I eventually taught myself some basic cartography and developed techniques that suited my limited skills.

So, I have created each map in this book to fit legibly on a book-size page. Where possible, I have based the background geography and the positions of rivers, towns, and other geographic locations upon a period map. Each of my maps includes notation about its source. In addition, some of the maps in this book include reproductions of the original hachures—the classic symbols for representing geologic relief in cartography—from the source map.

Readers who are familiar with the areas depicted on the maps in this book will undoubtedly find misrepresentations compared to today’s maps. These should not be considered errors as such, but rather indicative of the incomplete knowledge of the territories of New Mexico and Arizona at the time. This will help the reader understand why the people in this story were often off by many miles when describing where they were or where they were going, or in many cases simply had no clue as to their whereabouts.

Finally, I have written extended captions that enable each map to stand alone with its intended information. I believe that you will find the maps that accompany this revised, more expansive story about the Walker party very informative, and I trust that the text will be equally rewarding.

by Pieter S. Burggraaf, 2015

Notes for Written History Needs Maps:
(1) Henry P. Walker, Don Bufkin, Historical Atlas of Arizona, Second Edition (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press,1986), iii.

Excerpt from The Walker Party, The Revised Story: Across New Mexico and Arizona Territories and up the Hassayampa River, 1861-1863, by Pieter S. Burggraaf, available from Amazon.com. Used with permission. Read more about the book and view more of the maps in the Ortelius Showcase.

[Footnote to my readers: This article originally posted on the Mapdiva.com website, I thought it surely worth reposting. Forgive the shameless reference to my own commercial ventures.]

Install QGIS on a Mac in 10-Steps

**NEW: VIEW THE UPDATED STEPS FOR QGIS 2.16 – 07 Oct 2016**

The following instructions were for QGIS 2.10 and are kept here for historical record:

QGIS is an impressively powerful open source geographic information system (GIS). In 2010, I reviewed QGIS when it had an “All-In-One” installation bundle for the Mac. That easy installation has gone by the wayside, and while I still find QGIS an excellent GIS solution for Mac users, installation is much more of a chore. As a software developer myself, I can only imagine the installation process discourages use by the average consumer (and by average, I mean moderately sophisticated GIS users).

If you’re in that camp, this guide is for you… it provides (without warranty) a step-by-step guide to successfully install the supporting frameworks and the QGIS software (these instructions are for QGIS 2.10 built for Mac OS X Lion, Mountain Lion, Mavericks and Yosemite, though presumably will work with more current updates as they are added).

Installing QGIS on a Mac

Step One: Honesty

Installing most software on a Mac is easy, but installing QGIS on a Mac is a pain¹. I’ve stumbled through it a couple of times now.

There are supporting frameworks that must be installed first, and in a particular order, before the QGIS installation can begin. If you try installing QGIS before installing the supporting frameworks, you’ll likely see an error message like this:

qGIS installation error

Also, always read the ReadMe files included with your downloads before installing. For example, this important ReadMe message is included with the QGIS Installer:

 If you have an old QGIS.app in your Applications folder, trash it before installing QGIS.
 Old files may not be deleted by the installer, which may cause problems for QGIS.

In summary, the following downloads are required:

  1. Download GDAL Complete 1.11 framework package, which includes:
    • GDAL Complete.pkg (install framework package)
    • NumPy.pkg (install python module)
  2. Download Matplotlib Python module, which includes:
    • Matplotlib.pkg (install python module)
  3. Download QGIS for Mac Installer, which includes:
    • Install QGIS.pkg (install the app!)

 

The Real 10 Steps

STEP 1. To allow installation of non-Apple developer recognized software, first change your Mac Security Preferences to ‘Allow apps downloaded from: Anywhere’

STEP 2. Download the ‘GDAL 1.11 Complete’ framework package

Download ‘GDAL 1.11 Complete’ from http://www.kyngchaos.com/software/frameworks#gdal_complete (1.11 is the current version at the time I wrote this article — there may be newer version).

This is actually a package containing several frameworks more conveniently packaged together in one installer. Importantly, the required ‘GDAL Complete.pkg’ and ‘numPy.pkg’ are both included in the ‘GDAL 1.11 Complete’ download.

Double-click the ‘GDAL_Complete_1.11.dmg’ to view its contents:

STEP 3. install GDAL Complete —  double-click the ‘GDAL Complete.pkg’ and step through its installation.

STEP 4. Install NumPy — double-click the ’NumPy.pkg’ and step through its installation.

STEP 5. Download the ‘Matplotlib’ python module from http://www.kyngchaos.com/software/python

Double-click the ‘matplotlib-1.3.1-2.dmg’ to view its contents:

STEP 6. Install Matplotlib —  double-click the ‘matplotlib.pkg’ and step through its installation.

STEP 7. Download QGIS Mac OS X Installer from http://www.kyngchaos.com/software/qgis

Double-click the ‘QGIS-2.10.1-1.dmg’ to view its contents:

 

STEP 8. install QGIS —  double-click the ‘Install QGIS.pkg’ and step through its installation.

STEP 9. Proceed to your Applications folder and find the QGIS app. Double-click to launch.

Be patient, it took a little less than a minute on first launch for my copy of QGIS to fully open. Also, even if you are familiar with GIS software, don’t expect QGIS to be completely intuitive. Like any new app, you need to take the time to learn its features and user interface. Fortunately, there are some terrific learning resources available, like the QGIS Tutorials and Tips by Ujaval Gandhi and the QGIS User Guide.

You now have a sophisticated GIS software to learn and enjoy. Depending on your needs, you might even want to add some of the QGIS Plugins.

STEP 10. Your almost done! To finish things off you should do the following:

a. Change your Mac Security Preferences back to ‘Allow apps downloaded from: Mac App Store and Identified Developers’ (or Mac App Store only).
b. Save the three downloaded .dmg files, since they each contain uninstall instructions should you even need them.

 

¹ Software isn’t always easy. I appreciate the great work of good folks who support this open source (and free) software. The main release packages for QGIS for Mac are maintained by Kyngchaos, aka William Kyngsburye. (thank you!)

Indianapolis’ Most International Public Schools

Central Indiana is the epicenter of an explosion of English language learners (ELL). Where I live in Nora, our neighborhood elementary school is one of those hit hardest by rapid change. In April, The Star, Chalkbeat Indiana and WFYI Public Media collaborated on a week-long series of articles documenting the impact of the rising ELL population in Indianapolis’ schools. If you are interested to learn more, this well written article provides a back story to where we are today: As immigration reshapes Indianapolis, schools struggle to keep up.

To be sure, there are many interesting questions about the who and the why. But of course my favorite question is, “Where are those schools?” Using CartoDB’s web mapping tools, I created a simple multivariate map that displays the percentage of English language learners (ELL) school population and their relative size of enrollment. It is interesting to see the distribution of these high ELL schools, particularly noting those in Nora and Indy’s west side.

What the map doesn’t show is school performance. A few of the schools in red, those with the very highest ELL population in the state, also demonstrate high achievement. For example, on the west side of Indianapolis, in 2013-14, Carl Wilde School 79 received an “A” as its final letter grade for school accountability from the Indiana Department of Education. This is a school that consistently shows exemplary performance year after year. Nearby, Meredith Nicholson School 96 received a B as its final letter grade, a two letter grade increase from the previous year. With extremely high ELL populations, these school merit further study as examples of successful integration of ELL students without sacrificing school performance.